Saturday, November 27, 2010

Diabetes, Cookies And Tradition.

There are some things in life that I'm just not going to cater to diabetes on.

A tray full of assorted homemade Christmas cookies has been a staple at our family December gatherings, for as long as I can remember.  It had always been an aunt or uncle of mine who made these beautiful and delicious creations of my childhood.  There had to be a dozen different kinds, and you had to choose wisely, because there weren't enough of each cookie for everyone to have one of each.  They were in no way healthy - real butter, frosting, icing, etc. - but that wasn't the point.  They were a treat you looked forward to each year.

As years go on, we lose some of those we love, but we don't have to lose the traditions, too.  My aunt and uncle who always did the cookies have passed on, and so for the past 2 years, I've volunteered to pick up those reigns.  I love baking - or anything involving food prep - and specifically, I've come to love baking cookies.  There's something very calming about taking the chaos of a dozen or more ingredients and transforming it into dozens of small, perfect-looking treats.  I enjoy the process probably more than I enjoy the end product.  (Which says a lot - I love cookies.  I totally get this guy.)


The kitchen at my old townhouse, circa 2008.  Counters
were covered in cookies - I think I made 8 varieties that year. 
Which was "parring it down".

So that's where I am - the girl with diabetes, who makes the Christmas cookies.  Ironic?  Maybe.  I think it's important to not let diabetes dictate the things that are really important to you.  If that means eating Christmas cookies, then do it - and bolus accordingly.  The emotional impact of not being "allowed" might be worse than the health impact of a few hours in the 200's.

Diabetes dictates enough in my life.  It doesn't get cookies, too.

2 comments:

  1. "I think it's important to not let diabetes dictate the things that are really important to you. If that means eating Christmas cookies, then do it - and bolus accordingly. The emotional impact of not being 'allowed' might be worse than the health impact of a few hours in the 200's."

    I can't tell you the perfection in this quote. You are exactly right. <3

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  2. Amen!!
    It doesn't get my mothers triple layer jello or my son's favorite blueberry pie either!
    Ressy

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