Wednesday, January 11, 2012

I Don't Give A Sheet.

I dare you to not care what other people think about your diabetes.

Be fearless with me!

24 comments:

  1. WONDERFUL WONDERFUL POST :) What a wonderful message!!

    I'm sure one day when Cara is older I will say to her "why did you not just check your bg" and she may say "because I was in public and did not want to do it there" and I will show here this!!

    Thank you.

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  2. It's all about me & I don't give a sheet!

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  3. you have no idea how much i love this! amen, sister!

    great vlog, as always, my friend! <3

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  4. Hells yeah woman! I love the way you always put stuff out there. You're gonna be the next great vlogger!

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  5. Wonderful!!! I'm going to work harder on this. I can really identify especially with being in class in college. I'd try to hide my meter in my lap to check and then I'd slip my glucose tablets in my mouth, wondering what people in the row behind me thought... Why did I care?

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  6. This is awesome!!! THANKS for posting this! :D

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  7. Kim,
    This is awesome! Perhaps the best post since i've been following TMP.

    Alan

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  8. AWESOME. just watched it with my kid. love it! :)

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  9. Excellent post, I fully agree. I'm with ya!

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  10. I love you. And you space ship. That is all.

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  11. That was great, thanks I kind of needed that encouragement right now:-)

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  12. This is a really cool post! Boop Beep Boop I'm controlling my spaceship! Haha. I just tell people it's my mind reading maching :)

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  13. So I'm laying here with Sweets and she watched this with me... And it led to a great discussion about her not worrying about what other people think and that taking care of herself is most important. And I just have to thank you - because I watched this video with tears in my eyes because she needs to hear this. But it means so, so much more coming from YOU. Because you live it. You get it like I can't.

    Thanks, Kim. You rock!

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  14. That was wonderful. Higher than Cheech and Chong!! Literally LOL!!(-"Ear ache my eye!") Yes we shouldn't care! Maybe others will actually learn from our strange "poking" behaviors! Thank you for doing this ;)

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  15. Could not have agreed more, I whip out my meter/pump/etc. anytime, anywhere. I've never bothered to pay attention to those around me when I'm taking care of myself, and have yet to come across a rude person in the past 13 years. I find myself educating people more than anything.

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  16. Love the post and your attitude! I give it two cookies up.

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  17. great message! wish i had learned it many, many years ago!

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  18. This is so perfect! Even at 31 years and counting, I get embarrassed checking my blood in public. But gotta do it. I don't give a sheet.

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  19. I LOVE THIS! My 10yo daughter was diagnosed at the end of October...less than three months ago and she needs to hear this. I am going to show it to her. And, as a matter of fact, I'm going to link it to my Facebook so all my friends and family know what she is thinking. hee! You are a great role model! Thank you.

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  20. I can't tell you how much your blog means to me. A friend directed me here after I shared how diabetes has been kicking my butt lately. I've had type 1 since 1992 (age 14). I live a hectic life and I am always trying to figure out how to adjust my diabetes to my lack of a schedule. I am trying to turn over a new leaf and pay more attention to it, and not just treat it as an annoying afterthought. I am married with two kids (a ten-year-old girl and a seven-year-old boy, who consoled me after my 42 the other night when I just sat on the couch and cried--they both enjoy being "diabetes helpers" and pricking my finger and giving me shots). I love to read, have a lot of cats, work full-time, and am working toward my Master's in English. I'm vegetarian, although I've been eating yogurt with gelatin and just refusing to think about it. I haven't even read more then a few of your posts yet and I'm already crying. I didn't realize how lonely I have been. Thanks for all you do for diabetics.

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    1. Have you considered an imsulin pump? It gives you so much more freedom. My 12 year old son has had type 1 for 2 years and got his pump about 7 months after he was diagnosed. It makes it so much easier to manage his diabetes, and he is not stuck on a rigid schedule. One insertion every 3 days instead of 4 shots per day. Stay strong. You are not alone.

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  21. WOW. You really hit the nail on the head! How many times have people stared at me on the subway for testing? A LOT. I used to not do it (and almost passed out in the streets of Manhattan one day because of it), but then I decided that I didn't care what they thought or said. It was THEIR problem, not mine. And I shouldn't suffer for it.

    There was one time I had a low in Chem. Like, a 50. I felt fine enough, though, to notice that my professor had noticed that I was eating candies like House pops Vykodin (it's the easiest way to get all of them in your mouth in a hurry!) Another time I had a juice box and he also noticed. I remember feeling stupid, because he was just watching. He'd probably never seen a student do things like that in the second row of his lecture of over 200 students.

    And that's just it--most of the time, when people are staring, they're curious! And for the grossed-out people, let them be! Our health is too important to waste on idiots.

    So the next time I'm sitting in class and I need to test my BG and I'm sitting next to my professor (we sit in circles, even though we're in college), I'll be thinking of you! Now I almost want to gross her out! (Just kidding)

    Sorry if not much of this makes sense--I needed something to do at 5 AM while I waited for my low to come up. :-)

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  22. Kim, this is amazing and I want to forward, Facebook, twitter, Tweet, and SCREAM this to everybody I know and to everybody they know! I alternate between being the girl with a needle sticking out of her arm on the train and running to the bathroom to suck down an orange juice in private. I actually find treating a low in public bothers me more than taking a shot of Novolog or checking my blood sugar. I mean, you're shaking, sweaty and you feel crazy. You're wondering: Who else can hear my heart thump-a-thump in this room? Seriously, this blog post is like a PSA. thanks.

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  23. I am just now, after five years, becoming comfortable with public disclosure of my Diabetes. Yesterday, right inside of a movie theater I tested and bolused for popcorn. I am certain someone in there thought I was shooting heroin but I did not give a SHEET! :0)

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